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New electric vehicles to be built in Adelaide...

Discussion in 'News/Updates' started by Brettly-2008, May 16, 2019.

  1. rtmpgt

    rtmpgt Active Member

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    More car for less dollars. Four seats, offroad capability and a tray. Who cares about driving dynamics if you can't go past 110kph on most roads?
     
  2. J_D 2.0

    J_D 2.0 Member

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    As much as everyone is expecting EVs to replace ICE vehicles and make them obsolete it’s not likely to happen unless something major comes from left field with battery tech. With current battery technology the world doesn’t have enough of the rare metals used in these batteries to convert the world’s vehicles to being EVs.

    It’s not even about copper although it would run out too but the rarer stuff like cadmium, lithium, cobalt etc. These minerals will run out long before copper does and long before even half the worlds cars were replaced with EVs.

    The fact of the matter is that there is nothing like liquid fossil fuels for the energy yield contained in it and petrol and diesel vehicles will still be sold for a long time yet with EVs only making a difference at the margins.
     
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  3. rtmpgt

    rtmpgt Active Member

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    Give it time, like anything. Batteries will only get better over time, and the knock-on effects of better batteries benefits more than just the transport/automotive industry. Phones, Laptops and other small devices also benefit from better battery tech.

    The big issue is not necessarily charge capacity, 600km to a single charge is the norm for Teslas and some other EVs with larger batteries. The clincher is the charge time. It takes about 5 minutes on average to fill your gasser up. Once charge times hit this threshold, You'll see the massive push to EVs really take shape. It all really comes down to the chemistry of the batteries, and how hard they can be pushed. Right now Tesla's supercharging takes about 20-30 minutes to fully charge a pack from 3/4 full, which is pretty amazing considering that 10 years ago, all EV enthusiasts had for themselves is their wall sockets. The issue is though, that infrastructure's entirely Tesla-centric, and Tesla being Tesla, they act like Apple in that regard. **** all the other manufacturers, Supercharging is only for Teslas.

    Companies like Bosch and ACDelco (as in parts developers for multiple corporations) need to really jump on board and develop better charging tech. We're already seeing this with Rimac, who's allowing other companies to share their tech.

    So what about us Petrolheads? Well, for now you've got other fuels like Biodiesels and Ethanol fuels to provide a potential stop-gap if **** does hit the fan and ICE has to keep going for a while longer. Luckily our cars can be flashed to take E85 if need be. In fact I can see E85 and Pure alcohol being the enthusiast's fuel of choice unless E-Crates don't end up taking off.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2020
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  4. J_D 2.0

    J_D 2.0 Member

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    Agree with most of what you say but unless someone comes up with a way to remove the precious/rare metals out of the batteries and still get decent performance from them EVs will never become as ubiquitous as ICE cars as there won’t be enough precious metals to go around. Making better batteries out of common materials isn’t out of the realms of possibility of course as by and large human beings are a pretty clever bunch (well the ones that don’t hoard toilet paper anyway!).
     
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  5. rtmpgt

    rtmpgt Active Member

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    I work in a Mining-related field, So I can give you a little info on this.

    For context, Lithium is the 25th most abundant element on earth to date. (I say to date because as more exploration occurs more or less material is found, ask any geologist about this.) and it makes up about 0.0007% of the earth's mass. Considering the earth weighs a good 5.972 × 10^24 kg (about 5.9 sextillion tons, or 5,900,000,000,000,000,000,000 tons) and at that mass, 0.0007% of that is 1.8x10^15 tons, or 1.8 Quadrillion tons. That's a fuckton (literally) of lithium. More than enough to supplant the entire world's need for batteries, although I do agree that better batteries are needed, in regards to charge and discharge rates. Silicon Graphene packs are a step in the right direction, where the polymer cathode is replaced with a graphene cathode to facilitate better charge and discharge rates, but these packs have yet to hit EVs due to heat sensitivity issues. They're only just beginning to trickle into smartphones and laptops, however they've been in the Hobbyist space for a long-ass time as they're lighter and more powerful, making them perfect for RC models and drones. The most common chemistry used in cars is LiFePO4, or Lithium-Iron Phosphate, due to their charge rates and stability at those charge rates, as well as their improved heat resilience.

    Lithium is also a recyclable metal, but not in the conventional sense. You can't just chuck your batteries in the recycle bin with your plastics, cardboard and glass, it requires specialised equipment to recycle the materials, which is often why there's special disposal requirements for batteries, as there's certain companies which dedicate themselves to extracting the raw materials from batteries. Batteries can also be repurposed into low-current applications (such as house PV systems and battery backup supplies) once their high-current usefulness has been exploited. Tesla Powerwalls for example are all made from recycled batteries taken from older Tesla cars and from old laptops which use 18650 cells.

    Now, once again, I agree with you wholeheartedly about the idea of reducing the consumption of rarer metals and building much better batteries, but i'd be less concerned about the batteries and more concerned about motor tech, especially companies which depend on making BLDC motors with permanent magnets. Tesla uses AC induction motors, which do not use permanent Neodymium magnets.

    https://www.tesla.com/en_AU/blog/induction-versus-dc-brushless-motors

    Take a read of that when you get the time.
     
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